Post-Mortem: Deus Ex – Human Revolution

I didn’t ask for this.

Yeah, Jensen, I know.

Deus Ex HR had a pretty steep climb awaiting it from the get-go. Not only is it the prequel to one of the most beloved(and replayed) PC RPGs of all time(of which I’ll share my thoughts one day), it also follows on the heels of a sequel that was widely disliked at best; more commonly considered an insult to the franchise.

Where Infinity War went wrong(focusing more on action over being an open-ended RPG), HR seeks to stay true to the original. It certainly succeeds. Each level has a wide variety of objectives and methods in which to complete them.

Want to stay unseen, and only crack skulls when absolutely necessary? Adam’s your man.

Want to turn into a mass-murdering vigilante, blowing apart and skewering anyone who dares to cross you? He can do that too.

Apart from getting a little tedious, the gameplay stays enjoyable all the way through. Even the controversial boss fights, while quite difficult, are nothing the protagonist can’t handle without some quick movement and thinking. Well, being armed to the teeth helps as well, but that’s never difficult.

Where HR really shines is, thankfully, the story. As good as the original game’s mechanics were, it was really the story and characters that people often remember. Choices mattered, relationships could change based on how the protagonist acted. The world was believable and thought-provoking.

Human Revolution delivers on all this, too. Where the original game was in a cyberpunk-styled world already sinking into disrepair and ruin, HR takes place in a civilization at the peak of innovation.

There’s chaos on the horizon, though, and it’s clear the utopia isn’t going to last much longer.

The game really glows through character interactions, especially as the protagonist engages in debates with key figures. These verbal conflicts are often more engaging(and challenging) than any of the boss fights, and easily the highlight of an already great game.

Sure, you can augment the protagonist to get additional insight into their minds so you can know how to respond, but where’s the fun in that? (It’s actually quite fun.)

HR was a big success critically and financially, so even though the ending ties smoothly into the original game, hopefully the team at Eidos Montreal find a way to build on the foundation they’ve created.

He might not ask for it, but I will.

Post-Mortem: Demon Gaze

I really wanted to like this game. It had a lot going for it. Developed by Experience Inc., the sadists behind everyone’s favorite cyberpunk dungeon crawling(DC) RPG, Generation Xth: Code Hazard.

It’s not even a bad game! It has good combat, great music, an ‘okay’ story, and a lot of innovative steps for a DC.

What brings it down, you ask?

Tripe like that. Let’s be real: it’s fricking creepy. If a game is on a handheld, odds are, I’m playing it in public. More likely still, I’m playing it at work.

Would you want to see someone wondering why a half-naked girl is plastered all over your screen? Then you best not play Demon Gaze out in the open, because you’ll get a LOT of that.

It’s not just Ms. Underwear Fanatic there, either. Frequently throughout the game there’s lots of awkward content. Barely-dressed hotel managers lounging around in come-hither poses, mercenaries who wear next to nothing, even a basement-dwelling mortician who wears little more than a hoodie and undergarments.

Though in Prometh’s defense, she at least gets some of the most hilarious dialogue in the game, such as her deadpan ‘I’m so excited’ when you bring her quest items.

Fanservice gripes aside, Demon Gaze is a solid DC. Battles are lightning fast, the dungeons have a lot of colorful variety, and best of all, they get music. That might seem like a no-brainer, but a lot of DCs outside of Etrian Odyssey overlook the most important of features. If you’re gonna spend hours in a dungeon, at least have good music. Hell, have SOME music. (Looking at you, Class of Heroes.)

Also, the post-game and end-game bosses are the stuff of nightmares. So the game is worth a shot for the gameplay, if nothing else.

Just play it at home whenever a story beat hits.

Sakura Wars hits 30%!

This update was fun. There’s an animated cutscene with a LIPS choice right in the middle of it. Want to watch Sakura slap the living hell out of Sumire? Boy do I have the visual novel/SRPG for you!

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As you can see the LIPS system still needs work, and this update ends right at the battles. But they are working fine, so I’m not too worried about that portion.

The Sakura Wars [PC] Fan Translation Project

I’ve been waiting to formally announce this, and now it’s time.

For the unfamiliar, there was a PC port of the original Sakura Wars. It was released on just about everything, after all, since it took Japan by storm.

At some point, for some reason, it got a Russian release.

So it was then decided by some adventurous hackers that this would be the ideal avenue for a US release.

Sadly, their endeavors fell through.

Ours won’t.

That’s right, Iwakura Productions has officially taken over ownership of the Sakura Wars Fan Translation.

I’ll be editing, EsperKnight is hacking, and a translator by the name of Nezumi was kind enough to volunteer.

This is a brand new translation as well. No prior scripts are being used or referenced.

We’ve already got the script 1/12th completed. And insertion has begun.

Without further ado…


LIPS prompts will need tweaking, as you can see, but they work great.

Stay tuned. Imperial Floral Assault Troupe is go!